hello*today

  • Message
  • FAQ
  • Art Only
  • twitter
  • deviantart
  • instagram
  • store
  • Theme
  • trickywagon:

    Hello, hello, I am now open for digital and traditional commissions, please visit this post for more information ^^ !!
    Spreading the word and reblogs are very much appreciated ♥ thank you in advance~

    Hey hey, my friend sush is offering commissions! *q* If you have a buck to spare or wouldn’t mind giving her a quick reblog, she’d really appreciate it!

    Lastly, I would like to see you make a comic! Any kind would suffice! Be it from a 4 panel, to a short story. That'd be really awesome! ( ^ v ^ )

    Haha I didn’t intend on replying but thank you for the feedback! And as a response, I have drawn a story before: you can check it out in this post~

    ART NOTES.

    bashko:

    Hey guys, I’m wondering what

    -you’d like to see me focus on in my art

    -what you like so far

    -what you’d like to see improve

    -anything that irks you about my art.

    -stuff you want to see me draw.

    Feel free to go anon, I won’t be publishing or responding these but I’ll appreciate the input. Thank you!

    (via puffifish)

    Is it just me?.

    izumikrukawa:

    joodlez:

    Am I the only one who feels like it’s a terrible, exploitative thing to get 30+ guest artists for a book that’s being sold for personal gains?

    There is no mention of a charity and about 80% of the work is guest art, meaning the guest artists…

    First of all, please excuse any grammar or spelling mistake as English isn’t my first language. 

    I understand joodlez’s initial concern, and I think that defending artist’s rights is always a cause worth fighting for. However, as one of the contributing artists of the book, I feel like I’m being told something like “whoa can’t you see they’re using you?” which I find as inappropiate as the “please boycott this project unless it turns out to be a charity” tag on the original post. 

    I can’t speak for all the artists who joined this project but I can and will speak for myself. Whenever I decide to join a project like this I always keep three things in mind (I base my decision on these three things), 1) the theme 2) my time availability and 3) what will I earn if I join (and I’m not talking about money only, even though I work as an artist). Why not the cause? because any charity / fundraiser cause is always important, no matter where the funds are destined to go. There are people and institutions in need everywhere in the world, in all kinds of situations, so If it’s going either to a hospital or to the red cross or another kind of institution, it doesn’t make a difference to me. 

    Now about this case in particular, Kaze-Hime stated in her invitations what the cause of the book was, why she was organizing it and that she was open to provide further details to anyone who was interested in a deeper explanation. I had an available place in my schedule and I loved the theme, so I accepted, because the question “what will I earn if I join” was automatically answered from the moment I got excited with the theme. The idea of drawing one of the heroines from my childhood and joining a bunch of artists doing the same was enough for me. I made my decision by my own will and not because someone else threatened me with a gun. I don’t think every reward has to be monetary when you work as an artist. I do draw for a living, but that doesn’t prevent me from drawing things I like whenever I want and for whatever reason I find important. And by doing this I’m not selling myself nor undervaluing my art (quite the contrary, I’m respecting myself by dedicating some time to draw the things I like). I agree 100% that artists shouldn’t work for free and that many, many people try to take advantage of us because they don’t even appreciate our art. But none of the artists involved in this project are amateurs. If they accepted to join (knowing the cause even if it was vague, and even with their busy schedules), then they must have had their own personal and important reasons to do so. 

    So, contrary to what some people believe, supporting this project is supporting the artists involved. Not by giving them money, but by validating and respecting their decisions to have joined the book. The moment you say “I won’t support this because the main artist is earning thousands of dollars at the cost of other people’s work” you’re calling us, the contributing artists, a bunch of unexperienced naive idiots. I know that’s not what you meant and that you had good intentions from the beggining to clarify this whole thing, but please, respect the trust we have put into the main organizers and don’t take off weight to our decisions. 

    The most frustrating part of this is that the contributing artists are likely going to let it slide on the basis of preserving the relationship with the “main artist.”

    I almost felt insulted with this. I don’t even have a ‘relationship’ with Kaze-Hime, so why would it be so important to keep a relationship with someone I don’t know? And even if I was her intimate friend, why would it be wrong if I helped her? why would our relationship be in danger if I didn’t contribute to her book? If what you mean is that some people keep pseudo relationships with popular artists as if they were public relations because they benefit themselves with that, then I agree it is frustrating, but that’s actually their (and the popular artist’s) problem. 

    I’m not naive and I understand that there’s always the possibility that Kaze-Hime or any other artbook organizer could be scamming their contributors and secretly raising funds for themselves, but I’m willing to take the risk (and honestly I don’t think this case in particular is a scam). That’s why the main reason of my decision to join each project isn’t the cause per se. There are better and more direct ways to help those in need for me. But if I have good reasons to join and there’s an almost certain chance that I’m helping someone else, then why not? I’m not losing anything, I’m not devaluating myself as an artist. I’m actually earning things and probably helping others. 

    And last but not least, please don’t think that the people supporting the project is being scammed or lied to. They were never asked to donate for a charity. They’re only buying a product that was being promoted as such (an anthology), and not as a charity / fundraiser. Kaze-Hime is not taking money off people’s wallets and asking for donations in exchange for nothing. When you buy an artbook from a random professional artist you buy it because you want their art, you want their product, not because you know how they’ll use the money afterwards. And I think the same happened to the people who preordered from the first day; they were paying for the book they wanted to buy. They were never scammed. 

    Again, I know you had put courage into your post and had the best intentions, and I would have totally agreed with you if this was a project with unexperienced artists who were promised to ‘have exposure’ in exchange of their hard work (like all those stupid ‘job’ offers we see everywhere), but this isn’t the case. I speak for myself but I’m sure that I’m not the only one on this project who joined for their own personal and important reasons.

    (via soundlesswind)

    Hi! I was wondering about the path to hope artbook...where will the profits be going? To a charity, or spread among the artists? It looks like a beautiful book, and before ordering I just wanted to clarify?

    Asked by net-idol

    soundlesswind:

    The profits of the book are going to a good friend in great and imminent need; to help her pick her life back up. That’s why the project is named The Path to Hope. All participating artists know about it and have agreed to help out from the kindness of their hearts.

    Because it’s more of a personal matter, I did not disclose this detail to the public, nor was I comfortable with calling it a charity because that would give the wrong impression, although I actually have set aside a portion to be donated to a Cancer Society of her choice. To clarify, I am not keeping a cent.

    This artbook was planned only a couple short months ago. At the time I didn’t know what I could do. I wracked my brain for answers and ultimately I found I couldn’t do anything on my own. So I reached out to my friends…who have all been really good to me…and they reached back so that I wouldn’t have to lose one. 

    soundlesswind:

    The Path to Hope: Magical Girl x Pokemon Anthology

    Over 30 amazing artists from around the world come together to bring you one heck of a doujin crossover, with 48 vibrant, full-colour pages in B5 size, featuring magical ladies from modern and classic works.

    Artist List:

    Ah-Bao, Aka-Shiro, Akimiya, Cezaria, Cosmolade, Draa, Eaphonia, Einlee, Ferazhin, Goku-no-Baka, Hitsukuya, IKR, Joyfool, Kaze-Hime, Makotoffee, Kissai, KL-chan, Kurot, LuluSeason, Mimimiru, Minevi, Naguri, Namie-kun, Noxi, OfSkySociety, Pancake-Waddle, Raemz, Shiyun, Synpai, Toumin, Tsulala(Rem), Uviski, Yooani, and Zeiva! (artist previews will be reblogged/posted here)

    Featuring series such as:

    Cardcaptor Sakura, Kill la Kill, Little Witch Academia, Magic Knight Rayearth, Panty and Stocking, PreCure, Pretear, Princess Tutu, Puella Magi Madoka, Sailor Moon, Shugo Chara!, Tokyo Mew Mew, and many more!

    !! Limited stock book, grab your copy [HERE] now!!

    ~ $25 Regular Set ~

    • pre-order bonus: postcard of Princess Tutu

    ~ $35 Deluxe Set ~

    • deluxe pre-order bonus: additional 8pg art booklet!
    • pre-order bonus: postcard of Princess Tutu
    • Early Bird Special: sketched artwork on cardstock by Kaze-Hime (6 qty. available only!), including all of the above pre-order bonuses.

    Ships internationally. Pre-order end-date: Late May (tentative). Bonus booklet details TBD.

    This book will never be reprinted, ever!

    Made some wiper charms! I’m such a sucker for hexagon-shaped things hahahaha h  a  h a aa…

    Preorders are open on my storenvy here!

    12345Older   →